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Ashe Jo, Persian Traditional Food

Ashe Jo, Persian Traditional food

Bean, chickpea and herb soup. A national dish. For 5 to 6 people. Ingredients: 4 tablespoons of dried chick peas 3 tablespoons of dried red beans (the ones used in Iran have small white mark) 3 tablespoons of lentils 4 tablespoons of oatmeal 4 tablespoons of wheat 3 tablespoons of porridge mix 500g mixture of fresh herbs: coriander, parsley, chives, dill and spinach sprouts 1 tablespoons of dried mint 6 chicken legs or chicken stock 2 tablespoons of oil 2 onions 4 cloves of garlic 3 or 4 tablespoons of dried onions (to serve) Kashk * Salt & pepper The day before soak overnight the chickpeas and beans. Peel and chop the onions and cook in a skillet until soft. Mix together all the ingredients, add the stock to cover, and cook gently for about 30 minutes. Just before serving put on the soup a tablespoon each of Kashk and dried onions. * Kashk is typically Iranian, found in all markets in piles of whitish chunks, like pieces of chalk. It’s yogurt that is cooked for a long-time and then dehydrated. To use it, dissolve it in and equal quantity of hot water. For example, 1 glass of Kashk for…

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Khoresht Khalal

Khoresht Khalal

A stew of flaked and crushed almonds. A dish from the Kermanshah region For 5 to 6 people. Ingredients: 1 large onion or 2 small. 1kg of braising beef cut in pieces (150 g per person). 100 g of crushed almonds soaked overnight in rose water. 1 pinch of saffron steeped in water with an ice cube (about 5 cl of water). 100 g of barberries steeped for a few minutes in cold water. 1 tablespoon of tomato concentrate. 5 cardamom pods. 1 tablespoon of dried crushed rose buds. 6 dried lemons steeped in cold water for a few minutes. 2 table spoons for sesame oil with a little water Method: Peel and chop finely the onions. Put them into a heavy skillet with the cold sesame oil and water. Cook gently until soft. Add the pieces of meat, the drained barberries, the almonds with the rose water, the cardamom, the rose buds and 20 cl of water. Cover with water. Add the tomato concentrate and 3 tablespoons for the saffron-water mixture. Cook gently for 4 hours or 1h30 in a pressure cooker. Add salt and cook for another 15 minutes Serve with rice cooked in the Iranian style.

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Iranian Foods And Persian Cuisine

Iranian foods and Persian Cuisine

Iran has a lot of ethnic groups and tribes in her vast and historic land. Each ethnicity and tribe have their own traditional food according to the geography and climate. The type of food in the hot regions such as Iran Deserts is very different from the north west of Iran with its cold temperature. It also varies from the vegetarian food of the Caspian Sea to the spicy seafood of the Persian Gulf. The idea behind these distinct Persian dishes is not only to provide an endless variety of tasty recipes but, more importantly, for the food to have nourishing properties, using special herbs, to ensure a healthy body. To achieve this, it was vital to understand how traditional food was selected to suit the varying climatic conditions. The out of the ordinary, delicious Persian cuisine, combined with the colours of Iranian food, is for us the art of cooking. In our tradition, which goes back centuries, the hot and cold nature of the body and its temperament were taken into consideration when it was determined what to eat and where. This was to control the balance of this system. The ingredients, the root of everything we eat, are…

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Ranginak, Date Dessert, A Shiraz Specialty

Ranginak, Date Dessert, a Shiraz Specialty

Today we are going to teach you how to make a delicious date dessert that is very easy to make as well. Ingredients: 500g of dates. 3 or 4 tablespoons of flour. 2 teaspoons of cinnamon or more according to taste. A little powdered coconut to decorate. 3 or 4 teaspoons of vegetable oil. Place the dates in a dish having cut them in half and removed the nut. Very gently brown the flout in a dry pan, stirring continually. When the flour has a changer colour, add the oil and cinnamon. Mix well so as to obtain a smooth paste (a little like a pancake paste). Sprinkle with the coconut and some cinnamon. Pour the mixture over the dates and leave to sit for a minimum of 2 hours. It’s generally served at the end of the meal with tea or coffee.

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Iranian Herbal Teas

Iranian Herbal Teas

In Iran, consumption of herbal teas has long been common, but in recent years interest in herbal teas has increased dramatically. The reason for this growing interest is a number of factors. Some people use them to take advantage of their therapeutic benefits, others drink them to diversify their daily drink, and others use it as a stylish drink for receptions. Herbal teas are made from dried fruits, flowers, herbs, and spices. Therefore, they have a wide variety of flavors and aromas. Herbal teas can replace sugary drinks or even water. They have many health benefits and in this article, you will be introduced to some of these herbal teas and their proven effects.   Gole Gaav-zaban (or Borage in English) Gole Gaav-zaban is a beneficial and fragrant herb that many people use it for its sedative properties. It can be used in many ways, but it is more common to brew. Gole Gaav-zaban is a striking azure colour. In physical appearance and shape, it is similar to the pomegranate flower. It is a native of many parts of Iran and it can be found abundantly in the Alborz Mountain Range. Properties of Gole Gaav-zaban •    It has a warm…

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Ghormeh Sabzi, Persian Traditional Stew

Ghormeh Sabzi, Persian Traditional Stew

Eating tradition is one of the most enduring legacies of Iranian culture and civilization that still plays an important role among Iranian traditions. You cannot find any rituals and ceremonies in Iran where eating has no place. One of the most important Iranian special dishes that more or less has become national, is Ghormeh Sabzi. The popularity of Ghormeh Sabzi among Iranians is unexplainable. Almost everyone likes this genuinely delicious Persian food. It is an idiom among Iranians that if you could cook Ghormeh Sabzi well, you are a perfect chef. This traditional and yummy stew is not only favored among Iranians but also has popularity outside the borders of Iran. Ghormeh Sabzi is cooked in a unique way in every city and every home. In some cities, tomato sauce or pomegranate sauce is added to Ghormeh Sabzi. Some make this dish with pinto beans, whereas others use kidney beans for making this stew. Sometimes, women fry vegetables less in order to make the food healthier which eventually makes the stew to have a brighter green color, while others believe that vegetables should be fried to the point that they become completely dark and closer to black. Apart from being tasty,…

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Saffron, The Red Gold

Saffron, The Red Gold

Saffron is a valuable spice that has a unique aroma, and it is useful in treating some diseases. It is also known as red gold in the world. It grows in the southeast of Asia, southern Spain, other parts of southern Europe, and the US. However, Iran stands out from others in producing saffron. Saffron is usually harvested by hand. Due to the difficulty of harvesting, it is one of the most expensive plants in the world. Saffron cultivation in Iran goes back to more than 3,000 years ago. Did you know that in Achaemenid dynasty saffron was used for decorating bread and flavoring foods? According to Ferdinand Yutsi (German linguist), Darius, the king of Persia was applying a fragrant oil to the skin, consisting of a mixture of sunflower oil, milk, palm wine, and saffron. Historical documents point to the fact that Iranians have long been fond of saffron, so that they celebrate the feasts and gatherings, such as weddings and festivals, or welcoming elders and pilgrims with saffron drinks and food. In addition, in ancient times, saffron ink was used to write the titles of commands and letters of kings, as well as writing the titles and headings…

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